Sketchbook

Practice makes perfect.

I continued work on Javascript code that helps me generate perspective grids.


A caricature of George Lucas. I am thinking of practicing caricaturing a bit more, as that will help me push poses and expressions in my stories.


Here's another batch of panels I copied for practice. I decided to make them tonal studies and to try to use only three main tones.


One of the things I'm trying at the moment is copying panels from existing comics pages, for the purpose of study and practice. I get to practice penciling, inking and coloring and I'm hoping constructing poses and worlds and how to suggest things will seep in through osmosis. I'm also taking a colorist course at Comics Experience at the moment and also a course on how to create a story through images, panels at the Sequential Artists Workshop, both great places to learn the craft.


Playing some with the Gimp colorize function.


And hands. Having fun with this still.


Copying Charles Bargue plates for practice. The feet. Also tried out different ways of coloring and shading.


January 5th, 2017.

I finished the book prototype! And this is the final cover.


Almost finished! Just nine more pages to go developing a mockup prototype book. The book contains rough sketches of three comics adaptations of public domain one-act theater plays.

The goal is to have something to send to publishers, to see if they'd be intested in publishing something like this in its finished form.


So, time for work log number three!

I finished the thumbnails for "Warrior's Lament". It wasn't easy puzzling together the photo reference for it, but I think I like how the pacing came out. At any length, I'm putting it away for a while so I can return to it with a fresh pair of eyes. And an editor indicated he may have time to give me feedback on it also, so I'll wait for that.

So on I go, working on the theater play comics.


Work log entry number two. I'm still thumbnailing the theater plays, but an editor has hinted that he might be willing to give me feedback on my work, IF I do my homework. And his first assignment was for me to draw comics using photo reference.


I've decided to start a work log, a journal of sorts where I record my progress on my current project.


So why do a work log? I got this idea from the Comics Experience forums where comics writers keep a work log. It is very interesting, to me at least, to read someone else's process, and there's a lot going on in the process that forget about eventually.


But, as my 3-year-old daughter would ask, "why?" Several reasons. It is a place for me to document the decisions I made, to explain to my future self why I made a dumb decision. It is for those few people out there (hi mom, dad!) who may be interested in the process, and it feels nice to finish something once in a while. It keeps you going. The project I am now working on is the biggest one so far, so a regular schedule where I release a journal entry in which I write down how things are going will, hopefully, help me keep momentum.


So, for the first installment: what am I working on?


Drumrolls:


I'm finally ... going to be pitching a book to publishers!


So here's a cast of experimental characters I designed for a comedy series.


So these are a few of the pages I did spread out over the last four weeks weeks (mid Augustus to mid September 2016) to try out pen versus brush, pen AND brush, to try out different black and white line art styles. I copied existing artists also, as studies.


"A Great Performance" is another attempt to adapt Chekov's play "Swan Song" to sequential art. Interesting thing about the story: apparently, acting was a low-status occupation. You wouldn't say that looking at Hollywood now.


Below some character designs for the short story "The Leyster Heist"


Character Designs for my adaptation of "Madame Butterfly"


I continued work on Javascript code that helps me generate perspective grids.


Here's another batch of panels I copied for practice. I decided to make them tonal studies and to try to use only three main tones.


Playing some with the Gimp colorize function.


Copying Charles Bargue plates for practice. The feet. Also tried out different ways of coloring and shading.


Work log entry number two. I'm still thumbnailing the theater plays, but an editor has hinted that he might be willing to give me feedback on my work, IF I do my homework. And his first assignment was for me to draw comics using photo reference.


I've decided to start a work log, a journal of sorts where I record my progress on my current project.


So why do a work log? I got this idea from the Comics Experience forums where comics writers keep a work log. It is very interesting, to me at least, to read someone else's process, and there's a lot going on in the process that forget about eventually.


But, as my 3-year-old daughter would ask, "why?" Several reasons. It is a place for me to document the decisions I made, to explain to my future self why I made a dumb decision. It is for those few people out there (hi mom, dad!) who may be interested in the process, and it feels nice to finish something once in a while. It keeps you going. The project I am now working on is the biggest one so far, so a regular schedule where I release a journal entry in which I write down how things are going will, hopefully, help me keep momentum.


So, for the first installment: what am I working on?


Drumrolls:


I'm finally ... going to be pitching a book to publishers!


So here's a cast of experimental characters I designed for a comedy series.


Below some character designs for the short story "The Leyster Heist"


A caricature of George Lucas. I am thinking of practicing caricaturing a bit more, as that will help me push poses and expressions in my stories.


One of the things I'm trying at the moment is copying panels from existing comics pages, for the purpose of study and practice. I get to practice penciling, inking and coloring and I'm hoping constructing poses and worlds and how to suggest things will seep in through osmosis. I'm also taking a colorist course at Comics Experience at the moment and also a course on how to create a story through images, panels at the Sequential Artists Workshop, both great places to learn the craft.


And hands. Having fun with this still.


January 5th, 2017.

I finished the book prototype! And this is the final cover.


Almost finished! Just nine more pages to go developing a mockup prototype book. The book contains rough sketches of three comics adaptations of public domain one-act theater plays.

The goal is to have something to send to publishers, to see if they'd be intested in publishing something like this in its finished form.


So, time for work log number three!

I finished the thumbnails for "Warrior's Lament". It wasn't easy puzzling together the photo reference for it, but I think I like how the pacing came out. At any length, I'm putting it away for a while so I can return to it with a fresh pair of eyes. And an editor indicated he may have time to give me feedback on it also, so I'll wait for that.

So on I go, working on the theater play comics.


So these are a few of the pages I did spread out over the last four weeks weeks (mid Augustus to mid September 2016) to try out pen versus brush, pen AND brush, to try out different black and white line art styles. I copied existing artists also, as studies.


"A Great Performance" is another attempt to adapt Chekov's play "Swan Song" to sequential art. Interesting thing about the story: apparently, acting was a low-status occupation. You wouldn't say that looking at Hollywood now.


Character Designs for my adaptation of "Madame Butterfly"


I continued work on Javascript code that helps me generate perspective grids.


One of the things I'm trying at the moment is copying panels from existing comics pages, for the purpose of study and practice. I get to practice penciling, inking and coloring and I'm hoping constructing poses and worlds and how to suggest things will seep in through osmosis. I'm also taking a colorist course at Comics Experience at the moment and also a course on how to create a story through images, panels at the Sequential Artists Workshop, both great places to learn the craft.


Copying Charles Bargue plates for practice. The feet. Also tried out different ways of coloring and shading.


I've decided to start a work log, a journal of sorts where I record my progress on my current project.


So why do a work log? I got this idea from the Comics Experience forums where comics writers keep a work log. It is very interesting, to me at least, to read someone else's process, and there's a lot going on in the process that forget about eventually.


But, as my 3-year-old daughter would ask, "why?" Several reasons. It is a place for me to document the decisions I made, to explain to my future self why I made a dumb decision. It is for those few people out there (hi mom, dad!) who may be interested in the process, and it feels nice to finish something once in a while. It keeps you going. The project I am now working on is the biggest one so far, so a regular schedule where I release a journal entry in which I write down how things are going will, hopefully, help me keep momentum.


So, for the first installment: what am I working on?


Drumrolls:


I'm finally ... going to be pitching a book to publishers!


So these are a few of the pages I did spread out over the last four weeks weeks (mid Augustus to mid September 2016) to try out pen versus brush, pen AND brush, to try out different black and white line art styles. I copied existing artists also, as studies.


Below some character designs for the short story "The Leyster Heist"


A caricature of George Lucas. I am thinking of practicing caricaturing a bit more, as that will help me push poses and expressions in my stories.


And hands. Having fun with this still.


Almost finished! Just nine more pages to go developing a mockup prototype book. The book contains rough sketches of three comics adaptations of public domain one-act theater plays.

The goal is to have something to send to publishers, to see if they'd be intested in publishing something like this in its finished form.


Work log entry number two. I'm still thumbnailing the theater plays, but an editor has hinted that he might be willing to give me feedback on my work, IF I do my homework. And his first assignment was for me to draw comics using photo reference.


So here's a cast of experimental characters I designed for a comedy series.


Character Designs for my adaptation of "Madame Butterfly"


Here's another batch of panels I copied for practice. I decided to make them tonal studies and to try to use only three main tones.


Playing some with the Gimp colorize function.


January 5th, 2017.

I finished the book prototype! And this is the final cover.


So, time for work log number three!

I finished the thumbnails for "Warrior's Lament". It wasn't easy puzzling together the photo reference for it, but I think I like how the pacing came out. At any length, I'm putting it away for a while so I can return to it with a fresh pair of eyes. And an editor indicated he may have time to give me feedback on it also, so I'll wait for that.

So on I go, working on the theater play comics.


"A Great Performance" is another attempt to adapt Chekov's play "Swan Song" to sequential art. Interesting thing about the story: apparently, acting was a low-status occupation. You wouldn't say that looking at Hollywood now.


I continued work on Javascript code that helps me generate perspective grids.


Playing some with the Gimp colorize function.


So, time for work log number three!

I finished the thumbnails for "Warrior's Lament". It wasn't easy puzzling together the photo reference for it, but I think I like how the pacing came out. At any length, I'm putting it away for a while so I can return to it with a fresh pair of eyes. And an editor indicated he may have time to give me feedback on it also, so I'll wait for that.

So on I go, working on the theater play comics.


Character Designs for my adaptation of "Madame Butterfly"


A caricature of George Lucas. I am thinking of practicing caricaturing a bit more, as that will help me push poses and expressions in my stories.


January 5th, 2017.

I finished the book prototype! And this is the final cover.


Work log entry number two. I'm still thumbnailing the theater plays, but an editor has hinted that he might be willing to give me feedback on my work, IF I do my homework. And his first assignment was for me to draw comics using photo reference.


"A Great Performance" is another attempt to adapt Chekov's play "Swan Song" to sequential art. Interesting thing about the story: apparently, acting was a low-status occupation. You wouldn't say that looking at Hollywood now.


Here's another batch of panels I copied for practice. I decided to make them tonal studies and to try to use only three main tones.


And hands. Having fun with this still.


Almost finished! Just nine more pages to go developing a mockup prototype book. The book contains rough sketches of three comics adaptations of public domain one-act theater plays.

The goal is to have something to send to publishers, to see if they'd be intested in publishing something like this in its finished form.


I've decided to start a work log, a journal of sorts where I record my progress on my current project.


So why do a work log? I got this idea from the Comics Experience forums where comics writers keep a work log. It is very interesting, to me at least, to read someone else's process, and there's a lot going on in the process that forget about eventually.


But, as my 3-year-old daughter would ask, "why?" Several reasons. It is a place for me to document the decisions I made, to explain to my future self why I made a dumb decision. It is for those few people out there (hi mom, dad!) who may be interested in the process, and it feels nice to finish something once in a while. It keeps you going. The project I am now working on is the biggest one so far, so a regular schedule where I release a journal entry in which I write down how things are going will, hopefully, help me keep momentum.


So, for the first installment: what am I working on?


Drumrolls:


I'm finally ... going to be pitching a book to publishers!


So these are a few of the pages I did spread out over the last four weeks weeks (mid Augustus to mid September 2016) to try out pen versus brush, pen AND brush, to try out different black and white line art styles. I copied existing artists also, as studies.


Below some character designs for the short story "The Leyster Heist"


One of the things I'm trying at the moment is copying panels from existing comics pages, for the purpose of study and practice. I get to practice penciling, inking and coloring and I'm hoping constructing poses and worlds and how to suggest things will seep in through osmosis. I'm also taking a colorist course at Comics Experience at the moment and also a course on how to create a story through images, panels at the Sequential Artists Workshop, both great places to learn the craft.


Copying Charles Bargue plates for practice. The feet. Also tried out different ways of coloring and shading.


So here's a cast of experimental characters I designed for a comedy series.


I continued work on Javascript code that helps me generate perspective grids.


Copying Charles Bargue plates for practice. The feet. Also tried out different ways of coloring and shading.


A caricature of George Lucas. I am thinking of practicing caricaturing a bit more, as that will help me push poses and expressions in my stories.


I've decided to start a work log, a journal of sorts where I record my progress on my current project.


So why do a work log? I got this idea from the Comics Experience forums where comics writers keep a work log. It is very interesting, to me at least, to read someone else's process, and there's a lot going on in the process that forget about eventually.


But, as my 3-year-old daughter would ask, "why?" Several reasons. It is a place for me to document the decisions I made, to explain to my future self why I made a dumb decision. It is for those few people out there (hi mom, dad!) who may be interested in the process, and it feels nice to finish something once in a while. It keeps you going. The project I am now working on is the biggest one so far, so a regular schedule where I release a journal entry in which I write down how things are going will, hopefully, help me keep momentum.


So, for the first installment: what am I working on?


Drumrolls:


I'm finally ... going to be pitching a book to publishers!


"A Great Performance" is another attempt to adapt Chekov's play "Swan Song" to sequential art. Interesting thing about the story: apparently, acting was a low-status occupation. You wouldn't say that looking at Hollywood now.


Here's another batch of panels I copied for practice. I decided to make them tonal studies and to try to use only three main tones.


January 5th, 2017.

I finished the book prototype! And this is the final cover.


So here's a cast of experimental characters I designed for a comedy series.


One of the things I'm trying at the moment is copying panels from existing comics pages, for the purpose of study and practice. I get to practice penciling, inking and coloring and I'm hoping constructing poses and worlds and how to suggest things will seep in through osmosis. I'm also taking a colorist course at Comics Experience at the moment and also a course on how to create a story through images, panels at the Sequential Artists Workshop, both great places to learn the craft.


Almost finished! Just nine more pages to go developing a mockup prototype book. The book contains rough sketches of three comics adaptations of public domain one-act theater plays.

The goal is to have something to send to publishers, to see if they'd be intested in publishing something like this in its finished form.


So these are a few of the pages I did spread out over the last four weeks weeks (mid Augustus to mid September 2016) to try out pen versus brush, pen AND brush, to try out different black and white line art styles. I copied existing artists also, as studies.


Character Designs for my adaptation of "Madame Butterfly"


Playing some with the Gimp colorize function.


Work log entry number two. I'm still thumbnailing the theater plays, but an editor has hinted that he might be willing to give me feedback on my work, IF I do my homework. And his first assignment was for me to draw comics using photo reference.


Below some character designs for the short story "The Leyster Heist"


And hands. Having fun with this still.


So, time for work log number three!

I finished the thumbnails for "Warrior's Lament". It wasn't easy puzzling together the photo reference for it, but I think I like how the pacing came out. At any length, I'm putting it away for a while so I can return to it with a fresh pair of eyes. And an editor indicated he may have time to give me feedback on it also, so I'll wait for that.

So on I go, working on the theater play comics.

...

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